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ONLY TEXANS WILL BE ABLE TO READ THIS:

gaypee:

howdy y’all sweet iced tea hook em horns remember the alamo

 - when you hold the door for someone and they don't say thank you
93,798 plays

veryraresecrete:

i’m getting laser eye surgery. very excited to have laser eyes

cantgetanygayer:


Carole Lombard, 1935 

cantgetanygayer:

Carole Lombard, 1935 

lars134:

Jimmy Stewart and Carole Lombard in “Made for Each Other” (1939)

mauridianhallow:


lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity


I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.

mauridianhallow:

lambishwolf:

toptumbles:

This is called humanity

I have nothing to say on this, these people are the pinnacle of human compassion, and that is all there is to it.

HAPPY

larvitarr:

saddest moment in Pokemon history

alekshdfilms:

one time i forced my mom to play pokemon for at least half an hour and all she did was catch a butterfree and name it lowfat

heatherm00ch:


blancadiabla:

safety tips from Anubis

oh my fucking god

heatherm00ch:

blancadiabla:

safety tips from Anubis

oh my fucking god

farrahtales:

If you don’t strategically eat your food so that the last bites to go in your mouth are the tastiest look at your choices

pokescans:


Pikachu Friendly Book.

pokescans:

Pikachu Friendly Book.

wecanthavethat:

sarcasmsaidit:

these college emails i’ve been getting have started to sound more and more serial killer-ish.


Aw, Agnes!

wecanthavethat:

sarcasmsaidit:

these college emails i’ve been getting have started to sound more and more serial killer-ish.

Aw, Agnes!

haroldlloyds:

Happy Birthday Harold Clayton Lloyd, Sr. 
April 20, 1893 - March 8, 1971

"Harold Lloyd was one of the most charismatic innovators of film comedy, an excellent actor, and a consummate filmmaker." - Jack Lemmon

Harold Lloyd was, and remains, one of the most iconic figures in film history. His films influenced genres, styles and techniques that are still very much alive today. His comedic genius and timing redefined the genre of film comedy, and gave life to many sub-genres including the romantic comedy, the college comedy and the football movie. Character minded, and technically adept, his films were filled with joy, heartbreak, action, social comment, stunts and most of all the roaring spirit of the 1920s. They are still as endearing and hilarious today as they were when they came out, over 80 years ago. Lloyd was truly a genius, operating at the same level as his contemporaries, Chaplin and Keaton, and offered an alternative to the ‘grotesque’ comedy character. Lloyd’s Glass character was the boy-next-door, the average american go-getter, a character so normal that anyone could identify with him. He was The Boy. 

Lloyd’s legacy has been criminally underrepresented in the annals of film history, and it’s about time he made a return to public consciousness. He was so much more than a pair of glasses. He was the living embodiment of the spirit of 1920s America, and truly a master of cinema.